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The Power of Traditional Whiteboards

A classroom whiteboard is more than a writing surface; it’s a powerful tool that offers educators flexible teaching opportunities. The result of traditional whiteboard use? Stronger, more effective teaching.

That’s the premise of a Steelcase blog that builds a great case for the value of traditional whiteboards in classrooms. We’re sure that teachers in the thousands of classrooms throughout the U.S. that have EVERWhite whiteboards would agree.

The simplicity of whiteboards gives teachers a lot of flexibility in fostering ways for students to learn.
“Fixed and portable whiteboards and display screens provide information persistence and allow students to generate, capture and share their work,” the blog writer notes, adding, “Placement at the perimeter encourages students to move around the room, activating attention.”

Studies have shown that student use of wall-mounted or portable whiteboards enhances the learning experience.
“The act of writing and drawing engages the user physically and mentally, and that boosts learning,” the blog says. “For example, research at Indiana University showed that neural activity in children was far more enhanced in kids who practiced writing by hand than in those who simply looked at letters.”

There is also a level or pride when a student sees his or her work on a whiteboard, and the “ownership” of that work can make the lesson more memorable.

While most classrooms have a whiteboard in the front of the room, it’s common to have additional whiteboards on sidewalls. Those are often used by students to collaborate on assignments or otherwise do teamwork. Mobile whiteboards expand the flexibility to a greater degree.

“Content can be displayed throughout the room on portable whiteboards, adding to the flexibility of the space and increasing student access to content,” the blog writer notes.

Read more about Steelcase’s view of traditional whiteboards in its “Class, Can I Have Your Attention” blog.